Howard Yu Leap

Howard Yu: Leap [Book Review]

Legally or illegally, companies have for centuries copied the intellectual property of their competitors and encroached on their market share. One has only to think back to the commercial espionage of Francis Cabot Lowell, who in 1810-11, while strolling through dozens of British cotton mills, memorized critical details of mechanized textile manufacturing. Using this information, his Boston Manufacturing Company and eventually mills throughout New England took the growing American mass market away from British textile exporters.

Get The Timeless Reading eBook in PDF

Get the entire 10-part series on Timeless Reading in PDF. Save it to your desktop, read it on your tablet, or email to your colleagues.

We respect your email privacy

Q1 hedge fund letters, conference, scoops etc, Also read Lear Capital: Financial Products You Should Avoid?

Howard Yu Leap

Leap: How to Thrive in a World Where Everything Can Be Copied by Howard Yu

Leap: How to Thrive in a World Where Everything Can Be Copied (PublicAffairs/Hachette, 2018) by Howard Yu is, in the best sense of the word, a story book. It tells tales of woe as well as tales of resilience. These case studies all have a point, but, even if they didn’t, they would be fascinating in and of themselves.

Wu, a professor at the International Institute for Management Development (IMD) in Lausanne, Switzerland, believes that the key to outlasting copycat competition is to leap. “Pioneers must move across knowledge disciplines, to leverage or create new knowledge on how a product is made or a service is delivered. Absent such efforts, latecomers will always catch up.”

Wu articulates five principles necessary for making a successful leap: (1) understand your firm’s foundational knowledge and its trajectory, (2) acquire and cultivate new knowledge disciplines, (3) leverage seismic shifts, (4) experiment to gain evidence, and (5) dive deep into execution. These principles, as stated, are somewhat telegraphic, but Wu develops them through compelling case studies from companies spanning the globe: for instance, Steinway (an example of what not to do in the face of competition, in its case, from Yamaha), Procter & Gamble, Novartis, WeChat, Recruit Holdings, and John Deere.

Leap is the kind of book that everyone with an interest in business can profit from. And here’s a lesson that everybody, active investors/traders in particular, can profit from. “Successful executives often exhibit a bias for action. But it’s even more important to separate the noise from the signal that actually pinpoints the glacial movement around us. Listening carefully to the right signals requires patience and discipline. Seizing a window of opportunity, which means not necessarily being the first mover but the first to get it right, takes courage and determination. To leap successfully is to master these two seemingly contradictory abilities. The discipline to wait and the determination to drive, in balanced combination, often pay off handsomely.”

Article by Brenda Jubin, Reading The Markets

LEAVE A COMMENT


Saved Articles
X
TextTExtLInkTextTExtLInk

Subscribe to our mailing list

* indicates required

Opt out of occasional 3rd party offers


0