General Electric

The GE End Game: Bataan Death March Or Turnaround Play?

It seems like ancient history, but it was just 2001, when GE was the most valuable company in the world, commanding a market capitalization in excess of $500 billion. The quintessential conglomerate, with a presence in almost every part of the global economy, it seemed to have been built to withstand economic shocks and was the choice for conservative investors, scared of the short life cycles and the volatile fortunes of its tech challengers. Unlike other aging companies like Sears that have decayed gradually over decades, GE's fall from grace has been precipitous , with the rate of decline accelerating . . .

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